Clockverk

Consistently Inconsistent

1,918 notes

reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

universalequalityisinevitable:

An undeniably large part of what keeps poverty going is the fact that there are people who think that if they vote with the rich they’ll somehow magically become the rich. The trouble is, rich people don’t vote. They own.

"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat, but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." 

(Quote attributed to John Steinbeck but is under dispute. Regardless, it’s still true.)

Too many folk think they will win the lottery sooner or later.

15,577 notes

nudityandnerdery:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Seriously, I love Joan because she doesn’t accept Sherlock’s bad behavior, and she’s not shy about showing him how ridiculous he is. It means she can be a partner and equal, not someone who is dragged along to marvel at Sherlock’s genius.

The dynamic between the characters, Sherlock and Joan especially, is one of the primary reasons I love this show. I was so worried about it being a pale copy of the BBC version but in many ways it is so much more satisfying.

(Source: elementarymydearworld)